NW Kids July 2017: Business Profile with Olababy

What’s special about your business?

I’ve written for what we call editorial for a while—that’s content for publications, rather than for sales—and business profiles cross over the two disciplines.

A casual reader of a magazine and a hot prospect who’s heading to your website both want the same thing: a hook.

Give them the hook

Most people who visit your website, or who flip through a magazine, aren’t going to give you much time. You need to get them interested quickly, or they might decide that whatever you’re offering isn’t for them.

This can be visual, or text, but in an ideal world, visual design and copywriting work together to pique the reader’s interest.

When you flip through this month’s NW Kids Magazine, you’ll see a picture of a cute baby holding a rather unusual bottle. If you have a baby, you might stop flipping, because this obviously is geared to you.

Then, you’ll see the short story about how much my baby took to one of the spoons like bears to honey. If that interests you, you might move on to learn more about the company itself.

What’s the hook on your home page? What will make your prospects want to learn more?

Olababy

Check out this example of a profile I did for NW Kids Magazine’s July 2017 issue. (Page 17, if you please.) Olababy is a local company that designs baby feeding gear: bottles, spoons, and these cool bowls that you can use to steam and serve.

Okay, I haven’t actually tried to steam any food for *my* baby yet, despite the tasty peas in my garden that are about to give up the ghost. But those silicone spoons are a lifesaver.

Olababy business profile with baby drinking from bottle
Olababy business profile spread in NW Kids Magazine, July 2017

Getting the Story

For this profile, I got some information from the PR company to review. Then, the two principals of the company were willing to chat on a conference call. Lucky for me, because one of them was in China at the time. Our Friday afternoon chat was a very early Saturday morning chat for him.

A writer should come to the table with their own background research, and then figure out the tricky part—what’re the most important questions to ask? What do the customers really want to know? What’s missing?

People think that writers just write, but the real work is in thinking through different angles.

Finding an angle that gets the audience interested? That’s the fun part.

 

Whether it’s a profile or an about page, let me help you tell your story.

Shoot me an email today.

 

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